Nutrigenomics: There is no universal healthy diet

| February 21, 2013 |
Based on genetics, a healthy diet that may be good for one person may be harmful for another. A ‘healthy diet’ would not apply to everyone the same. (Credit: Shutterstock via VOXXI.) Based on genetics, a healthy diet that may be good for one person may be harmful for another. A ‘healthy diet’ would not apply to everyone the same. (Credit: Shutterstock via VOXXI.)

The following is an editorial summary.

The ubiquitous Food Pyramid (and newcomer MyPlate) offer the same dietary recommendations for everyone above two years of age, including those with a higher risk of chronic disease. They overlook the fact that genetically, we are all different.

This explains why some people eat seemingly healthy diets but have trouble controlling their weight, while others can eat french fries and burgers but remain thin.

Based on genetics, foods that may be good for one person’s diet may be harmful for another’s. That is not to say that we shouldn’t follow the Dietary Guidelines, but when looking at our plate up close, the ingredients may differ from one person to another depending on the individual’s genetic structure

View the original article here: Genetics and nutrition: Do all healthy diets work for everyone?

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  • Ben

    The basic premise here is very incorrect — the statement “This explains why some people eat seemingly healthy diets but have trouble controlling their weight, while others can eat french fries and burgers but remain thin.” is entirely false. There are metabolic issues which can cause outside-of-normal weights, and the basic thermodynamics of calories intaken vs. expended. A “healthy” diet eaten in excess will have the body storing calories as extra tissue and fat. Likewise a hypo-caloric diet of “french fries and burgers” will cause an individual to lose weight. A “healthy” diet is considered such on the balance of its nutritional content — does it contain adequate levels of O-3,6,9 FAs, B-series vitamins, ascorbic acid, folic acid, fiber, polyunsaturated FAs, etc.? This is independent of genomics.