Is organic agriculture “affluent narcissism?”

| November 8, 2012 |
Some of the devotion from consumers attains almost cult-like status, which is why a recent article by Stanford Universityresearchers that was dismissive of health or nutritional benefits of organic foods created such a furor. Perhaps the most illogical tenet of organic farming is the exclusion of “genetically engineered” plants – but only if they were modified with the newest, best, most precise and predictable techniques.

Some of the devotion from consumers attains almost cult-like status, which is why a recent article by Stanford Universityresearchers that was dismissive of health or nutritional benefits of organic foods created such a furor.

Perhaps the most illogical tenet of organic farming is the exclusion of “genetically engineered” plants – but only if they were modified with the newest, best, most precise and predictable techniques.  Except for wild berries and wild mushrooms, virtually all the fruits, vegetables and grains in our diet have been genetically improved by one technique or another – often as a result of seeds being irradiated or genes being moved from one species or genus to another in ways that do not occur in nature.  But because genetic engineering is more precise and predictable, the technology is at least as safe as – and often safer than – the modification of food products in cruder, “conventional” ways that can qualify as organic.

View the original article here: Is Organic Agriculture “Affluent Narcissism?”