Examining the human health implications of GM-labeling debate

| November 6, 2012 |
“It’s really a value-laden decision. How do you act in the face of scientific uncertainty?” said Patrice Sutton, MPH, a researcher with UCSF’s Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment (PRHE), which works through research, clinical care and public policy to prevent exposures of harmful chemicals in the environment. “From a public health perspective, there’s a general principle that you would have people be able to decide for themselves.” Robert Gould, MD, an associate adjunct professor in the UCSF Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences and PRHE’s director of health professional outreach, was a delegate to the California Medical Association’s (CMA) annual meeting last month, at which they renewed a 2002 policy supporting the labeling of GMO foods. The American Public Health Association, the nation’s largest organization of public health professionals, also endorses GMO labeling.

“It’s really a value-laden decision. How do you act in the face of scientific uncertainty?” said Patrice Sutton, MPH, a researcher with UCSF’s Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment (PRHE), which works through research, clinical care and public policy to prevent exposures of harmful chemicals in the environment. “From a public health perspective, there’s a general principle that you would have people be able to decide for themselves.”

Robert Gould, MD, an associate adjunct professor in the UCSF Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences and PRHE’s director of health professional outreach, was a delegate to the California Medical Association’s (CMA) annual meeting last month, at which they renewed a 2002 policy supporting the labeling of GMO foods. The American Public Health Association, the nation’s largest organization of public health professionals, also endorses GMO labeling.

View the original article here: Genetically Modified Food Labeling Through the Lens of Public Health